Ian Glomski outside his home in Charlottesville, Va., where hops grow in his garden. He quit an academic career in microbiology to start a liquor distillery. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Richard Harris/NPR

Lagunitas Brewing Company's owners are nervous that the Russian River water they currently use to make beer could run out in the drought that's hammering California. Courtesy of Lagunitas Brewing Company hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Lagunitas Brewing Company

Home-brewing will become legal in Mississippi in July, if the governor signs a newly approved bill. Mississippi and Alabama are the last two states in which brewing beer at home is illegal or in a gray area. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

More and more gluten-free beers are entering the marketplace. We asked a librarian with celiac disease for her list of favorites. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Bill Chappell/NPR

Great Basin's Mayan Maybe? beer has been a fast seller, the company's brewmaster says. Jazz Aldrich/Great Basin Brewing Company hide caption

itoggle caption Jazz Aldrich/Great Basin Brewing Company

Some 49,000 people came to Denver for the 2012 Great American Beer Festival, which featured a record 2,700 beers in the festival hall. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Bill Chappell/NPR

Kiuchi Brewery vice president Youichi Kiuchi holds a bottle of his company's Hitachino Nest beer. To make beer, the brewery is using equipment that once was used for sake. Lucy Craft/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Lucy Craft/NPR

President Barack Obama enjoys a beer at The Pump House in Cedar Falls, Iowa, this month, but would you like to know what's in his homebrew? There's a petition for that. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Carolyn Kaster/AP

A row of taps highlights specialty and imported beers at Brouwerij Lane, in Brooklyn, New York. Craft brewers have found a way to thrive, even as the U.S. economy struggles. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Bill Chappell/NPR

This farmer, pouring maple sap into his pail near Wilmington, Vt., in 1954, may have turned the dregs of the season's sap into beer. Robert F. Sisson/National Geographic/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Robert F. Sisson/National Geographic/Getty Images