chronic pain chronic pain

Physical therapy as well as cognitive therapy are part of a promising approach to managing chronic pain without drugs. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Across the state of Maine, the number of prescriptions for painkillers is dropping. But some patients who have chronic pain say they need high doses of the medication to be able to function. Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Getty Images

Intent On Reversing Its Opioid Epidemic, A State Limits Prescriptions

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The HHS inspector general found that some 22,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries seem to be doctor shopping for opioids — obtaining large amounts prescribed by four or more doctors and filled at four or more pharmacies. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

John Evard, 70, at the Las Vegas Recovery Center last July. Evard, a retired tax attorney, checked into a rehabilitation program to help him quit the prescribed opioids that had left him depressed, groggy and dependent on the drugs. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Opioids Can Derail The Lives Of Older People, Too

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When it comes to chronic pain relief, the CDC is asking doctors and patients to think about alternatives to opioids. Robin Nelson/Zumapress.com/Corbis hide caption

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Robin Nelson/Zumapress.com/Corbis

CDC Has Advice For Primary Care Doctors About Opioids

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Primal posture: Ubong tribesmen in Borneo (right) display the perfect J-shaped spines. A woman in Burkina Faso (left) holds her baby so that his spine stays straight. The center image shows the S-shaped spine drawn in a modern anatomy book (Fig. I) and the J-shaped spine (Fig. II) drawn in the 1897 anatomy book Traite d'Anatomie Humaine. Courtesy of Esther Gokhale and Ian Mackenzie/Nomads of the Dawn hide caption

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Courtesy of Esther Gokhale and Ian Mackenzie/Nomads of the Dawn

Lost Posture: Why Some Indigenous Cultures May Not Have Back Pain

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Generic hydrocodone plus acetaminophen pills seen in a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt., in 2013. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Americans Weigh Addiction Risk When Taking Painkillers

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