eclipse of the sun eclipse of the sun

On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch. Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr hide caption

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Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr

Why Future Earthlings Won't See Total Solar Eclipses

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Retired astrophysicist Fred Espenak (right) and his wife, Patricia, photographed a total solar eclipse from Jinta, China, on Aug. 1, 2008. He has witnessed 27 such events and plans to be in Casper, Wyo., on Aug. 21 — depending on the forecast. Courtesy of Fred Espenak hide caption

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Courtesy of Fred Espenak

Go See It, Eclipse Chasers Urge. 'Your First Time Is Always Special'

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This combination picture shows the annular solar eclipse as viewed from Tokyo earlier today. Kazuhiro Nogi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi /AFP/Getty Images

Amelia Templeton reporting for 'Morning Edition'

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