Stephen Neary/Connie Li Chan/Robin Arnott

The last bubble: A neighborhood laid out in in the 1970s in Charlotte County, Florida, for a subdivision that never got built. DigitalGlobe hide caption

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Planet Money

Before Toxic Assets Were Toxic

Back in the day, Planet Money's pet toxic asset seemed like a benign way to help more people buy houses.

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The last bubble: A neighborhood laid out in in the 1970s in Charlotte County, Florida, for a subdivision that never got built. DigitalGlobe hide caption

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Planet Money

The Origin Of Toxie

We talk to a woman who bought a house during the boom — and whose mortgage wound up in our toxic asset. Can you ever spot a bubble before it bursts?

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This house in Florida was sold into what may have been a mortgage-fraud ring. Chana Joffe-Walt/NPR hide caption

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Planet Money

Toxie's Dark Past

A home inside Toxie, our toxic asset, is part of a $200 million mortgage scheme.

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