East Cleveland medic Anthony Savoy says his city's ambulances are diverted frequently to a hospital further away, and that can add one or two minutes to response times. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Cleveland Pressures Hospitals To Keep ERs Open To All Ambulances
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Houston firefighters learn to use a video chat program that will let them consult with an emergency medicine doctor while responding to 911 calls. Courtesy of Houston Fire Department hide caption

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Doctors Make House Calls On Tablets Carried By Houston Firefighters
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Freedom House paramedics, who first were deployed in the 1960s, provided a crucial service for Pittsburgh residents. The program became a national model for emergency medical transport and care. Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh hide caption

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How Pittsburgh's Freedom House Pioneered Paramedic Treatment
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The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters. Greg E. Mathieson Sr./Mai/Landov hide caption

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Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think
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Eric Bleeker and a partner respond to 911 calls in this vehicle. The medical team can run simple lab tests and prescribe some drugs, which may spare a patient a trip to the ER. Eric Whitney hide caption

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Replacing An Ambulance With A Station Wagon
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After a tornado leveled Moore, Okla., last year, firefighter Shonn Neidel (left) developed an app that helps first responders locate storm shelters under the wreckage. Courtesy of Shonn Neidel hide caption

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Storm Shelter App Helps Pinpoint People Amid Tornado's Rubble
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ATLANTIC CITY, NJ - JULY 8: The roulette wheel spins at Caesars Atlantic City July 8, 2006 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Caesars, along with Atlantic City's 11 other casinos reopend this morning after they were forced to close their gambling floors for the first time in their 28-year history due to the New Jersey state budget impasse. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images) William Thomas Cain/Getty Images hide caption

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Becky Cole was eight months pregnant with her son Ryan when she passed out. Her husband performed CPR for six minutes with the help of a dispatcher before medics arrived. Courtesy of Medic One Foundation hide caption

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Dispatchers' CPR Coaching Saves Lives When Every Minute Counts
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