On the list of pathogens (from left): Staphylococcus aureus (causes skin infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (causes blood infections, pneumonia, infections after surgery) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (causes the sexually-transmitted disease gonorrhea). NIAID; Scott Chimileski and Roberto Kolter, NIH Image Gallery/Flickr; NIAID hide caption

toggle caption
NIAID; Scott Chimileski and Roberto Kolter, NIH Image Gallery/Flickr; NIAID

Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513254232/513388183" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Antibiotic- and growth-hormone-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. Despite farmers pledging to reduce or stop antibiotics use, a new report finds that sales of antibiotics for use on farms are going up. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Don Ryan/AP

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles has been penalized in all three years since the creation of a Medicare program to reduce patient-safety issues in hospitals. FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images

The bacteria were discovered in New Mexico's Lechuguilla Cave — a part of Carlsbad Caverns and the second deepest cave in the continental U.S. Courtesy of Max Wisshak hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Max Wisshak

Million-Year-Old 'Hero Bug' Emerges From Cave

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504691357/505227872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chickens at a poultry farm in Hefei, eastern China. Antibiotics are often used to keep them healthy in densely packed quarters. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
STR/AFP/Getty Images

U.N. Pledges To Fight Antibiotic Resistance In Historic Agreement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494914739/494914740" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

toggle caption
Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489346240/489361702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Mostly Harmless/Flickr

'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487529338/487774066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ebola virus particles (blue) emerge from a chronically infected African green monkey cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
NIAID/Flickr

'Pandemic' Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens Of Millions Coming?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467637849/467688331" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript