Chickens at a poultry farm in Hefei, eastern China. Antibiotics are often used to keep them healthy in densely packed quarters. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.N. Pledges To Fight Antibiotic Resistance In Historic Agreement

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Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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Once scientists grew these Staphylococcus lugdunensis bacteria in a lab dish, they were able to isolate a compound that's lethal to another strain commonly found in the nose that can make us sick — Staphylococcus aureus. Mostly Harmless/Flickr hide caption

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Mostly Harmless/Flickr

'Nose-y' Bacteria Could Yield A New Way To Fight Infection

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Ebola virus particles (blue) emerge from a chronically infected African green monkey cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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'Pandemic' Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens Of Millions Coming?

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Cattle graze in a field near Sacramento, Calif. California Gov. Jerry Brown, along with many health advocacy groups, has called the overuse of antibiotics "an urgent public health problem." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The antibiotic resistant bacteria have been found in pigs, pork and people in China. This pig is from a farm on the outskirts of Beijing. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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E. Coli Bacteria Can Transfer Antibiotic Resistance To Other Bacteria

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Diners wait in line at a Subway sandwich shop on September 15, 2015 in Chicago, Ill. Subway will serve antibiotic-free turkey and chicken by the end of 2016, but it may take nine years for its suppliers of beef and pork to go antibiotic-free as well. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Penicillin became a wonder drug for fighting infections in the 1940s. Jean-Claude Fide was an early adapter, injected in 1948 in the French town of Mont-pres-Chambord. Bert Hardy/Picture Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Can You Protect Your Tummy From Traveler's Diarrhea?

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