Yes, you could do this at home. Growing bacteria you find in a pile of dirt or a local pond might reveal the next big antibiotic. Charlotte Raymond/Science Source hide caption

itoggle caption Charlotte Raymond/Science Source

Young broilers nibble feed at a chicken farm in Luling, Texas. The Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidance on how drug companies label antibiotics for livestock. Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr

Turkeys sit in a barn in Sonoma, Calif. An estimated 46 million turkeys are cooked and eaten during Thanksgiving meals in the U.S. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In recent years, pork producers have found ways to keep the animals healthy through improved hygiene. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

itoggle caption M. Spencer Green/AP

Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes severe diarrhea, can be difficult to treat with antibiotics. Stefan Hyman/University of Leicester hide caption

itoggle caption Stefan Hyman/University of Leicester

Unless it's strep throat, antibiotics are unlikely to help you get over a sore throat. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Craig Rowles tends to his pigs in a barn near Carroll, Iowa. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR