A view inside Grotta Paglicci, in southern Italy, with wall paintings. Scientists say a 32,000-year-old stone found inside the cave was used to grind flour. Courtesy of Marta Mariotti Lippi hide caption

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Say aaaaaah! Dental caries and other signs of oral disease are plain to see in the upper teeth of this hunter-gatherer, between 14,000 and 15,000 years old. The findings challenge the idea that the original paleo diet was inherently healthy, says paleo-anthropologist Louise Humphrey. It all depended, she says, on what wild foods were available. Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote hide caption

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Looks Like The Paleo Diet Wasn't Always So Hot For Ancient Teeth
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Nom Nom Nom: From left, a cast of teeth from a chimpanzee, Australopithecus afarensis and a modern human. We switched from an ape-like diet of fruits and leaves about 3.5 million years ago, according to fresh research. There's evidence that meat-eating came about a million years or so later. William Kimbel/Institute of Human Origins hide caption

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A 3-D reconstruction of Mummy 38's CT scans shows calcification in her aorta and iliac arteries. Courtesy of The Lancet hide caption

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Some of The Salt's most popular posts of 2012 included coffee, pink slime and Downton Abbey. Daniel Acker/Landov; Carnival Film & Television Limited 2011/Masterpiece; Adam Cole/NPR; Robyn Mackenzie/iStockphoto.com; Lass/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Daniel Acker/Landov; Carnival Film & Television Limited 2011/Masterpiece; Adam Cole/NPR; Robyn Mackenzie/iStockphoto.com; Lass/Getty Images

Members of the online community Track Your Plaque get advice from a doctor and each other on how to cook low carb meals. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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We Evolved To Eat Meat, But How Much Is Too Much?
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