Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton walks past the peppers at the El Rey grocery store in Milwaukee, Wis., during a campaign stop in 2008. Clinton tells NPR that she eats a fresh hot pepper a day to stay healthy on the campaign trail. She may be on to something. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Hillary Clinton's Elixir: Can A Hot Pepper A Day Boost Immunity?

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The same nerve receptor that responds to the green paste on your sushi plate is activated by car exhaust, the smoke of a wildfire, tear gas and other chemical irritants. iStockphoto hide caption

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Sushi Science: A 3-D View Of The Body's Wasabi Receptor

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Ready to feel the burn? Check out our tips for tiptoeing into hot sauce. John Kuntz/The Plain Dealer/Landov hide caption

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Love Hot Sauce? Your Personality May Be A Good Predictor

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Jasjit Kaur Singh, an Indian chef, cooks kaala channa, a traditional spicy Sikh dish. A psychologist says that children who grow up in cultures with lots of spicy food are taught to like spice early on. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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