New York City's Blue Hill restaurant is the biggest buyer of "Habanadas," a habanero bred to be heatless, so the focus is on its melon-like flavor. Courtesy of Blue Hill hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Blue Hill

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton walks past the peppers at the El Rey grocery store in Milwaukee, Wis., during a campaign stop in 2008. Clinton tells NPR that she eats a fresh hot pepper a day to stay healthy on the campaign trail. She may be on to something. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

Hillary Clinton's Elixir: Can A Hot Pepper A Day Boost Immunity?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463858189/463877200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The same nerve receptor that responds to the green paste on your sushi plate is activated by car exhaust, the smoke of a wildfire, tear gas and other chemical irritants. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Sushi Science: A 3-D View Of The Body's Wasabi Receptor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/398065961/398342049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ready to feel the burn? Check out our tips for tiptoeing into hot sauce. John Kuntz/The Plain Dealer/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
John Kuntz/The Plain Dealer/Landov

Love Hot Sauce? Your Personality May Be A Good Predictor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/383364416/383578492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jasjit Kaur Singh, an Indian chef, cooks kaala channa, a traditional spicy Sikh dish. A psychologist says that children who grow up in cultures with lots of spicy food are taught to like spice early on. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images