Four participants in last year's armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon were convicted of crimes on Friday. Darryl Thorn and Jason Patrick (left) were convicted on conspiracy charges, while Jake Ryan and Duane Ehmer (right) were convicted of depredation of government property. Multnomah County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Multnomah County Sheriff's Office via AP

Ammon Bundy, the leader of an anti-government militia, carries a copy of the U.S. Constitution in his pocket. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Bundy Militia Not Backing Down Following Oregon Trial Acquittal

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Although expanding Medicaid in Oregon didn't drive down the recipients' overall use of hospital emergency rooms, the state has seen a decline in avoidable use of ERs by 4 percent in the past two years, according to state statistics. Paul Burns/Getty Images hide caption

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Emergency Room Use Stays High In Oregon Medicaid Study

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This rock formation at Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area — shown in October 2008 — was apparently destroyed by vandals. The sandstone pedestal, which was found in pieces last week, was roughly 7 feet to 10 feet across and located in a fenced-off section of the park. Chelsea Rutherford/KATU News via AP hide caption

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Chelsea Rutherford/KATU News via AP

Amber Lakin (front) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space. Leah Nash for NPR hide caption

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Leah Nash for NPR

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

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Jamie Shupe, 52, was born male, married a woman and had a child. But Shupe felt neither male nor fully female. Now, an Oregon judge has allowed Shupe to identify as non-binary, believed to be a first in the United States. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB News hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB News

Neither Male Nor Female: Oregon Resident Legally Recognized As Third Gender

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A photo from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge after the armed occupation in January and February. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr hide caption

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Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr

This photo taken from an FBI video shows Robert "LaVoy" Finicum during a confrontation with police on Jan. 26. On Tuesday, authorities said police were justified in killing Finicum. AP hide caption

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AP

Media wait at a checkpoint about 4 miles from the Malheur Wildlife Refuge Headquarters near Burns, Ore., as the sun rises on Thursday. The FBI had surrounded the last four protesters holed up at a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon and were waiting for them to surrender. Rob Kerr/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Police operate a checkpoint as part of a containment strategy around the Malheur Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore., on Wednesday. Although leaders of the group that occupied the federal site were arrested, armed militants remain at the refuge. Rob Kerr/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Kerr/AFP/Getty Images

Eight people who were involved in the occupation of the headquarters of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon were arrested on Tuesday. (Top, from left) Ammon Bundy, Ryan Bundy, Brian Cavalier and Shawna Cox. (Bottom, from left) Joseph Donald O'Shaughnessy, Ryan Payne, Jon Eric Ritzheimer and Peter Santilli. Multnomah County Sheriff's Office/Maricopa County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Multnomah County Sheriff's Office/Maricopa County Sheriff's Office via AP

Ammon Bundy And 7 Other Militants Arrested; 1 Killed Near Oregon Refuge

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The armed individuals occupying part of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon include Ryan Bundy. On Thursday, he had a gun and a tape measure on his side. Bundy is the son of Cliven Bundy, whose 2014 armed standoff with the federal Bureau of Land Management in in Nevada drew national attention. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A U.S. flag hangs over a sign in front of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Tuesday near Burns, Ore. An armed group has occupied the refuge since the weekend. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Why There's No Sign Of Law Enforcement At Site Of Oregon Takeover

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People gather as Ammon Bundy speaks with reporters during a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Monday near Burns, Ore. Bundy's occupation of the federal land started on Saturday. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Oregon Occupation Sheds Light On Local Frustrations, But Divides Residents

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