Wednesday marks the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The history of the attack is clear, yet the conspiracy theory that President Franklin D. Roosevelt allowed the attack to take place to draw America into the war never dies. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

No, FDR Did Not Know The Japanese Were Going To Bomb Pearl Harbor

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President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed Congress on Dec. 8, 1941, a day after the Pearl Harbor attacks, to ask for a declaration of war against Japan. FDR Presidential Library hide caption

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FDR Presidential Library

Roosevelt Asks Congress To Declare War On Japan

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An anti-Prohibition parade float circa 1925. Olde Tymes/Flickr hide caption

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Olde Tymes/Flickr

The Moonshine Stimulus

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