A vendor shows a t-shirt with the face of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán for sale in Mexico City on July 20, 2015. ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Latin America

'People Are Still Dying On The Streets' In Mexico's Drug War

Despite the well-publicized capture of drug kingpin "El Chapo," ordinary Mexicans don't think much has changed in the ongoing violence.

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"As far as I know ... there is no problem of over-incarceration for rich, white financial or environmental executives," defense lawyer Jeffrey Robinson of the American Civil Liberties Union said. Aleksandar Dancu/iStock hide caption

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Comedian Bill Cosby performs at the Buell Theater in Denver, in January. Cosby, 77, is facing sexual assault accusations from more than two women, with some of the claims dating back decades. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Tuesday's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to not review an ordinance passed by Alameda County, California, means that drug makers will now need to pay for collection and disposal of unused drugs in the county. iStockphoto hide caption

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A plane sprays coca fields in San Miguel, Colombia, in 2006. The Colombian government announced this week that it is phasing out the U.S.-backed aerial coca-eradication program over health concerns. William Fernando Martinez/AP hide caption

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Bill Parcells has been coach to the Dallas Cowboys, the New York Giants, the New England Patriots and the New York Jets. Robert B. Stanton/Getty Images hide caption

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Reid Kennedy, materials manager at San Francisco General Hospital, stands next to racks of saline solution. He has had to carefully manage the hospital's supply of saline during this shortage. Mark Andrew Boyer/KQED hide caption

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Heroin (left) and Suboxone (right) are both for sale on the street. Mara Zepeda/NPR hide caption

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Planet Money

Episode 391: The Anti-Addiction Pill That's Big Business For Drug Dealers

It's totally legal. So why do lots of addicts have to buy it on the street?

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Suboxone is used in the treatment of opiate dependence. Drugs.com hide caption

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