The half-naked hatchetfish, shown here munching on a shrimp, is just one of many billions of mesopelagic ocean fish that migrate up and down the water column each day to hunt food and avoid predators. Wikimedia hide caption

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Mysterious Ocean Buzz Traced To Daily Fish Migration
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The long "oral arms" of the adult moon jelly, Aurelia aurita, extend from near its mouth, in the center of the bell. Magnus Manske/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Instead Of Replacing Missing Body Parts, Moon Jellies Recycle
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Cannonball jellyfish soak up the sun on a South Carolina beach. Fishermen are now pursuing the pest that used to clog their shrimping nets. Courtesy of Steven Giese hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Steven Giese