Bacteriophages, in red, look like tiny aliens, with big heads and skinny bodies. They use their "legs" to stick to and infect a bacterial cell, in blue. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Your Gut's Gone Viral, And That Might Be Good For Your Health

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Rugby and meat: a treat for the gut? A study suggests yes. Here Tony Woodcock (left) and Owen Franks of the All Blacks rugby team turn sausages on the barbecue in 2011 in Christchurch, New Zealand. Phil Walter/Getty Images hide caption

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Frequent spitting up affects about half of babies under six months, but it's usually not gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Finally, A Map Of All The Microbes On Your Body

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