Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak sits in the dock during a court hearing in Cairo on June 8. Amr Abdallah Dalsh /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Amr Abdallah Dalsh /Reuters/Landov

In Cairo, soldiers have put barbed wire around the constitutional court, one of many government institutions under guard. Amina Ismail /MCT/Landov hide caption

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Amina Ismail /MCT/Landov

From 'Morning Edition': Cairo Bureau Chief Leila Fadel reports

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Protesters taunt security forces moving in to clear one protest camp near the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. The military-backed government described the camps as violent and unlawful. Hesham Mostafa/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Hesham Mostafa/EPA/Landov

Egypt's military and the nation's interim leaders say the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi was not a coup, but rather a response to public demand. Morsi's supporters believe otherwise. If it was judged to be a coup, the U.S. might have to cut off aid to Egypt's military. Ed Giles/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Giles/Getty Images

A wounded man is helped from the scene Monday in Cairo after shots were fired during a protest against the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. Mohammed Saber /EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Mohammed Saber /EPA /LANDOV

State media and other sources had confirmed Saturday that Mohamed ElBaradei, the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, would be Egypt's interim prime minister. Later in the day, the president's spokesperson walked it back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A poster showing ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was hanging on barbed wire outside the headquarters of the Republican Guard in Cairo on Saturday. On the other side, guards stood watch. Khaled Elfiqi /EPA/Landov hide caption

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Khaled Elfiqi /EPA/Landov

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood hold a picture of deposed President Mohammed Morsi during a rally outside Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque on Friday. Mahmud Hams /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Hams /AFP/Getty Images

People dance and cheer in Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 4, the day after former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted from power. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi wave flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Wednesday. Shortly afterward, the military staged a coup, ousting Morsi and suspending the constitution. Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters/Landov

Listen to Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Abdul Mawgoud Rageh Dardery on All Things Considered

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Protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square react after President Mohammed Morsi was ousted by the military on Wednesday. The head of Egypt's armed forces, Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, issued a declaration suspending the constitution and appointing Egypt's chief justice as interim head of state. Suhaib Salem/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Suhaib Salem/Reuters/Landov

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi says he will not resign, despite a military demand that he reach a compromise with critics. Here, Morsi supporters take part in a drill during a demonstration in the suburb of Nasr City Tuesday. Ed Giles/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Giles/Getty Images

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square again Monday during a protest calling for the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images