A right wing activist holds a sign during a rally at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park on April 27, 2017 in Berkeley, California. Protestors are gathering in Berkeley to protest the cancellation of a speech by American conservative political commentator Ann Coulter at UC Berkeley. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Conservative author and pundit Ann Coulter delivers remarks to the Conservative Political Action Conference in 2012 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A now-deleted tweet from @ALT_USCIS was included in a complaint Twitter filed against the Department of Homeland Security. Twitter says DHS tried to unmask the user behind this account, which has "expressed dissent in a range of different ways," including this early tweet that "the author apparently believed cast doubt on the Administration's immigration policy." Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California hide caption

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Twitter/U.S. District Court Northern District of California

40 year-old Longhua worker Wu Songtao and co-worker Wang Fuxiang stand at the bottom of their coal mine in Dalianhe. It's one of China's largest open-pit mines. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

As China's Coal Mines Close, Miners Are Becoming Bolder In Voicing Demands

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Silicon Valley engineer Bindu Reddy created the new social network Candid that facilitates online conversations without trolls. Courtesy of Bindu Reddy hide caption

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Courtesy of Bindu Reddy

Can Candid Conversations Happen Online Without The Trolls?

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Bryton Mellott's photo of himself burning an American flag led to his arrest in Urbana, Ill. The local prosecutor says no charges will be filed against Mellott. Bryton Mellott/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bryton Mellott/Screenshot by NPR

Comedian Jan Boehmermann, who performed a satirical poem about Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, appeared at the German Television Awards in January in Duesseldorf, Germany. Mathis Wienand/Getty Images hide caption

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Mathis Wienand/Getty Images

The iconic clock tower and library at University of California, Berkeley. The University of California system, especially Berkeley, has a stormy history around free speech and spying by the federal government. John Morgan/Flickr hide caption

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John Morgan/Flickr

At Calif. Campuses, A Test For Free Speech, Privacy And Cybersecurity

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Ren Zhiqiang, a Chinese real estate tycoon, attends a conference in Beijing last November. Ren, 54, is locked in a battle with the government over the question of free speech. ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images hide caption

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ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images

In Social Media Battle, Real Estate Mogul Takes On Chinese Government

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New York police officers stand outside an Apple Store on Tuesday while monitoring a pro-encryption demonstration. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

In Fighting FBI, Apple Says Free Speech Rights Mean No Forced Coding

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Activists from India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) shout slogans during a protest in Mumbai against the Students Union at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi on Feb. 15, 2016. Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images

Sedition Charge Divides India As Protests Continue

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An Indian student holds a placard demanding the release of student leader Kanhaiya Kumar during a protest at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi on Tuesday. Tsering Topgyal/AP hide caption

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Tsering Topgyal/AP

Protests Widen As India Debates When Speech Is Sedition

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Visitors look at Ai Weiwei's "Trace" installation — part of the @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz series — last year on Alcatraz Island in the San Francisco Bay. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashamoni, wife of blogger Niloy Chakrabati, cries at her house in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Friday after her secular activist husband was hacked to death by suspected Islamist extremists. A.M. Ahad/AP hide caption

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A.M. Ahad/AP

People gather at a church in Gilbert, Ariz., for an Easter sunrise service in 2010. The town passed a law to regulate signs a church in town was temporarily posting to provide event directions, but the Supreme Court on Thursday declared those rules unconstitutional. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Justices Give Officials More Say On Cars' Plates, Less On Roadside Signs

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The indictment against 24-year-old Palestinian Ayman Mahareeq says comments he posted on Facebook illegally insulted the West Bank police force and the Palestinian Authority, which governs the West Bank. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

In The West Bank, Facebook Posts Can Get You Arrested, Or Worse

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A statue of the scales of justice stands above the Old Bailey, the courthouse where many high-profile libel cases are tried, in London. The U.K. is a popular place for libel cases to be filed because of laws that make it difficult for journalists or the media to prevail. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

On Libel And The Law, U.S. And U.K. Go Separate Ways

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Two teams face off over the motion, "Liberals Are Stifling Intellectual Diversity On Campus," at the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate. Chris Zarconi/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Chris Zarconi/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Do Liberals Stifle Intellectual Diversity On The College Campus?

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Remembering Al Bendich, Fierce Defender Of Free Speech

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