Ren Zhiqiang, a Chinese real estate tycoon, attends a conference in Beijing last November. Ren, 54, is locked in a battle with the government over the question of free speech. ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images hide caption

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In Social Media Battle, Real Estate Mogul Takes On Chinese Government

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New York police officers stand outside an Apple Store on Tuesday while monitoring a pro-encryption demonstration. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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In Fighting FBI, Apple Says Free Speech Rights Mean No Forced Coding

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Activists from India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) shout slogans during a protest in Mumbai against the Students Union at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi on Feb. 15, 2016. Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sedition Charge Divides India As Protests Continue

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An Indian student holds a placard demanding the release of student leader Kanhaiya Kumar during a protest at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi on Tuesday. Tsering Topgyal/AP hide caption

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Protests Widen As India Debates When Speech Is Sedition

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Visitors look at Ai Weiwei's "Trace" installation — part of the @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz series — last year on Alcatraz Island in the San Francisco Bay. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashamoni, wife of blogger Niloy Chakrabati, cries at her house in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Friday after her secular activist husband was hacked to death by suspected Islamist extremists. A.M. Ahad/AP hide caption

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People gather at a church in Gilbert, Ariz., for an Easter sunrise service in 2010. The town passed a law to regulate signs a church in town was temporarily posting to provide event directions, but the Supreme Court on Thursday declared those rules unconstitutional. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Justices Give Officials More Say On Cars' Plates, Less On Roadside Signs

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The indictment against 24-year-old Palestinian Ayman Mahareeq says comments he posted on Facebook illegally insulted the West Bank police force and the Palestinian Authority, which governs the West Bank. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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In The West Bank, Facebook Posts Can Get You Arrested, Or Worse

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A statue of the scales of justice stands above the Old Bailey, the courthouse where many high-profile libel cases are tried, in London. The U.K. is a popular place for libel cases to be filed because of laws that make it difficult for journalists or the media to prevail. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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On Libel And The Law, U.S. And U.K. Go Separate Ways

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Two teams face off over the motion, "Liberals Are Stifling Intellectual Diversity On Campus," at the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate. Chris Zarconi/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Debate: Do Liberals Stifle Intellectual Diversity On The College Campus?

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Remembering Al Bendich, Fierce Defender Of Free Speech

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Amy Barnes, of Marietta, Ga., has won a settlement after she says police abused her constitutional rights. Barnes was arrested and held in solitary confinement overnight for cursing at officers. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Israelis in Tel Aviv take part in a protest against the military operation in the Gaza Strip on July 26. Israel's permissive approach to free speech has long fostered protests like these, but some Israelis now say that dissenters are traitors. Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images hide caption

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War In Gaza Tests Israel's Tolerance For Dissent

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Facebook users post more than 2.5 billion messages and updates each day, worldwide. All posted content must comply with the company's standards, which ban many forms of speech that, in the United States, are protected offline. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Facebook's Online Speech Rules Keep Users On A Tight Leash

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Egyptians use their mobile phones to record celebrations in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the popular revolt that drove Hosni Mubarak from power in 2011. Twitter was often used to record happenings during the Arab Spring. Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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On Its 7th Birthday, Is Twitter Still The 'Free Speech Party'?

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