The bistro imagines the day when will be possible to culture "meat thread" made from long strands of muscle tissue. On a "special knitting machine," meat is thread into a steak. Submarine Channel/Next Nature Network/Bistro In Vitro hide caption

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Mixed martial arts fighter Cornell Ward (from left), chef Daniel Strong, triathlete Dominic Thompson, lifestyle blogger Joshua Katcher and competitive bodybuilder Giacomo Marchese at a vegan barbecue in Brooklyn, N.Y. Courtesy of James Koroni hide caption

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For These Vegans, Masculinity Means Protecting The Planet

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Theoneste Rwayitare, a Rwandan refugee who resettled in Vermont last year, pours powdered milk into a bucket for milking at the Vermont Goat Collaborative's Pine Island Farm. Angela Evancie for NPR hide caption

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Got My Goat? Vermont Farms Put Fresh Meat On Refugee Tables

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Somali refugees lead their herds of goats home for the night outside Dadaab, Kenya. A new study shows that animals in many parts of the developing world require more food — and generate more greenhouse emissions — than animals in wealthy countries. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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You'll know you've gotten somewhere on the long and winding road to veganism when the greenery you see along the way starts to look seductively delicious. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Sarah Hallacher swirled in white clay with red to mimic the fat marbling, just like you see in prime cuts of meat. Courtesy of Sarah Hallacher hide caption

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Michael Sharry visits with Bill, front, and Lou (now deceased) on Nov. 8, 2012, at Green Mountain College in Poultney, Vermont. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Some Americans are cutting back on red meat, and health concerns seem to be the biggest reason they're doing it, a survey found. Shmeliova Natalia/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Only Luxembourgers eat more meat per person than Americans. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

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