wellness wellness

Clare Kelley practices "forest bathing" along the edge of an urban forest on Roosevelt Island, in the middle of the Potomac River. In contrast to hiking, forest bathing is less directed, melding mindfulness and nature immersion to improve health. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Forest Bathing: A Retreat To Nature Can Boost Immunity And Mood

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Employers are gathering detailed health and wellness information about their workers. Are confidentiality safeguards up to the task? Andy Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Andy Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images
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Smokers More Likely To Quit If Their Own Cash Is On The Line

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Wellness At Work Often Comes With Strings Attached

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Helping employees take the time to go for a walk instead of reaching for junk food when energy flags boosts productivity, some firms find. Jamie Grill Photography/Tetra Images/Corbis hide caption

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Jamie Grill Photography/Tetra Images/Corbis

Targeting Overweight Workers With Wellness Programs Can Backfire

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