Political parties Political parties

Make America Dinner Again guest Affan Khokhar (left, seated) talks with hosts Tria Chang and Justine Lee (front right, seated) after the dinner as guests (from left to right) Afam Agbodike, Walter Rodriguez and Nick Tucker continue their conversation. Sonia Paul for NPR hide caption

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Sonia Paul for NPR

Political Perspectives Are The Main Course At These Dinner Gatherings

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Colorado Democrats pack a gym at a Denver high school during caucuses on March 1, 2016. The crowds and long lines have led to calls for the state to move to an open primary system. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

Americans Don't Like Caucuses, But Replacing Them With Primaries Isn't Easy

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A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary Feb. 9 inside a voting booth at a polling place in Manchester, N.H. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Independent Voters In Colorado, Florida And Arizona

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Thousands of Ethiopian opposition activists demonstrate in Addis Ababa on June 2, 2013. The demonstrations were organized by the newly formed Blue Party opposition group. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Ethiopia's Blue Party Tries To Reacquaint Nation With Dissent

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Robert "Heshy" Bucholz is seen in an undated photo provided by Bucholz. A member of the Modern Whig party, Bucholz campaigned door to door and beat his Democratic opponent 36-24 to earn a four-year term as an election judge in Philadelphia's Rhawnhurst section. AP hide caption

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AP