General Mills is bringing back the popular '90s cereal in a nod to nostalgia and in the hopes of boosting its weak cereal sales. General Mills/AP hide caption

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Medical residents including Dr. Amy Ho (bottom right) helped with first aid at the Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago. Courtesy Amy Ho hide caption

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Noelle Johnson has a lengthy commute via bus and train to her job near Washington, D.C. She's been working toward her B.A. for nine years, and when she finally finishes, she says, she'll be able to afford to live closer to work. James Clark/NPR hide caption

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Students taking part in Columbia University's Ebola design challenge demonstrated for judges how to use a special chamber for decontaminating small items. Courtesy of Columbia Engineering hide caption

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More than 65 percent of first marriages today are between couples already living together. For millennials, cohabitation is almost a rite of passage. Oliver Hoffmann/iStock hide caption

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We asked you to send in your embarrassing instant messenger handles from days gone by. Thanks for sharing, Blondsoccerplyr, AgentGiggleChunk and absofsteel3616! iStockphoto hide caption

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The phone company Vonage reported a drop in voice mail retrievals over the past year. Many of those ignoring voice mails are millennials. iStockphoto hide caption

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Phillip Underwood and Michelle Sheridan and their children, Logan and Lilliana, gather in their living room in Frederick, Md., after a long day of work and school. The couple had delayed marriage, in part for financial reasons. James Clark/NPR hide caption

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Millennials are often painted as the entitled, selfie-snapping generation. But many researchers say that "me" time will help young people make better decisions in the long run. © Eugenio Marongiu/iStockphoto hide caption

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The Manhattan-based headquarters of Charity: Water. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Millennials seem to prioritize the environment, but may want to dissociate from the "treehugger" baggage of the term "environmentalist." Getty Images hide caption

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Fabianie Andre with her 3-year-old daughter, Leilah, at their home in suburban Boston. Andre is one of many millennials who lack a college education. Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin, NPR Producer, 28, Washington, D.C. Standard Census: #white. #nprcensus: #halfjewish #gaymarried #creative Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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This 30-year-old millennial helped found — and now runs — Facebook. His net worth is estimated at more than $33 billion. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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New Boom

Why You Should Start Taking Millennials Seriously

There are more millennials in the U.S. than there are baby boomers. Why do they get so many eye rolls?

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Mormon missionaries walk through the halls at the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah, in January 2013. A new survey by Carnegie Mellon University shows that more millennials report they "talk to God" than turn to religion for guidance. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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