The killer whale J2, better known as "Granny," pokes her head out of the water in the Salish Sea near the San Juan Islands of Washington in July 2016. Granny, who was thought to be about 105 years old at the time, was presumed to have died later that year. Mark Malleson/Center for Whale Research/AP hide caption

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Mark Malleson/Center for Whale Research/AP

Menopause Mystery: Why Do Female Killer Whales Experience The Change Of Life?

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Fatty plaque (shown here in yellow) blocks about 60 percent of this coronary artery's width. The increasing thickness of artery walls is just one factor that can increase vulnerability to a heart attack or stroke. Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source hide caption

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Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source

Possible Heart Benefits Of Taking Estrogen Get Another Look

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Diane Bigda/Getty Images/Illustration Works

Menopause: A Gold Mine For Marketers, Fewer Payoffs For Women

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Hormones May Help Younger Women With Menopause Symptoms

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Depression and chronic pain are associated with dry-eye syndrome, a British study finds. And it's more likely as you age. Boris Lyubner/Illustration Works/Corbis hide caption

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Boris Lyubner/Illustration Works/Corbis

Hormones clearly influence a women's health, but figuring out how is a tricky business. Andrew Ostrovsky/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Andrew Ostrovsky/iStockphoto.com

Once hailed as a feminine fountain of youth, then vilified, hormone replacement therapy may finally be finding its place as a short-term treatment for menopause symptoms. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Cheers! Moderate drinking might slow age-related bone loss in women. /iStockphoto.com hide caption

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/iStockphoto.com

Nightly Glass Of Wine May Protect Boomer Women's Bones

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