A refinery in Anacortes, Wash. In 2016, voters in Washington state rejected an initiative that would have taxed carbon emissions from fossil fuels such as coal and gasoline. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Participants at the Marrakech climate conference stage a public show of support for climate negotiations and the Paris agreement on Friday. David Keyton/AP hide caption

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David Keyton/AP

As Marrakech Climate Talks End, Worries Remain About U.S. Pullout

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Agustin Mayta Condori shows a sick alpaca, which he predicted would die the next day because of subfreezing temperatures in the southern Andes in Peru. Thousands of alpacas have died in the region. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

About 70 percent of Earth is covered by clouds at any given moment. Their interaction with climate isn't easy to study, scientists say; these shape-shifters move quickly. NOAA/Flickr hide caption

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NOAA/Flickr

Climate Change May Already Be Shifting Clouds Toward The Poles

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French Foreign Minister and President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius (center) gives a thumbs up while U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and French President Francois Hollande applaud after the final meeting of the U.N. conference on climate change in Le Bourget, France, on Saturday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

Ousmane Ndiaye loves computer models, climate forecasting and babies. Here he holds farmer Mariami Keita's 4-month-old baby girl, Ndeye. Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS) hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS)

A view of a phytoplankton bloom near Alaska's Pribilof Islands. The milky green and light blue shading of the water indicates the presence of vast populations of microscopic phytoplankton. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A Baltimore oriole perches near apple blossoms in Mendota Heights, Minn. Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Images Group via Getty Images

More Than Half Of U.S. Bird Species Threatened By Climate Change

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