Bull trout are running out of time in Montana as their traditional waters heat up, biologists say. By moving more than 100 fish to higher elevations, fisheries scientists hope to save the species by seeding a new population in waters that will stay cooler longer. Jim Mogen/USFWS hide caption

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Scientists Try Radical Move To Save Bull Trout From A Warming Climate

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Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

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A 2008 view of the leading edge of the Larsen B ice shelf, extending into the northwest part of the Weddell Sea. Huge, floating ice shelves that line the Antarctic coast help hold back sheets of ice that cover land. Mariano Caravaca /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Big Shelves Of Antarctic Ice Melting Faster Than Scientists Thought

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An earlier spring in Montana's Glacier National Park means full waterfalls at first — but much drier summers. Robert Glusic/Corbis hide caption

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There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

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A new study suggests the Greenland Ice Sheet did not fully melt during previous periods of global warming — and that it preserved a tundra beneath it. Joshua Brown/ University of Vermont hide caption

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The small patch in the middle of the image is Aulacomnium turgidum, a type of bryophyte plant. Researchers in the Canadian Arctic say they are surprised the bryophytes were still green, even after being covered by ice. Courtesy of Caroline La Farge hide caption

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From the May 29, 2013, 'Morning Edition': NPR's Joe Palca reports on the discovery

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