Object (or Luncheon in Fur), by Meret Oppenheim. In 1936, Oppenheim wrapped a teacup, saucer and spoon in fur. In the age of Freud, a gastro-sexual interpretation was inescapable. Even today, the work triggers intense reactions. Flavia Brandi/Flickr hide caption

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Llapingacho is one of Marcella Kriebel's favorite recipes from her travels. It is an Ecuadorian cheese-stuffed potato pancake. Juxtaposed is causa, a Peruvian dish of layered potato, shrimp and avocado. Marcella Kriebel hide caption

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From left: Sodium benzoate, azodicarbonamide, shellac. The images are from Ingredients: A Visual Exploration of 75 Additives & 25 Food Products. Dwight Eschliman/Regan Arts hide caption

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Kumu (sp. Parupeneus porphyreus). The Whitesaddle Goatfish has a special place in Hawaiian culture. In ancient Hawaii, the fish were used in offerings to the gods. Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada hide caption

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Le louche refers to the transformation that happens when water is added to absinthe, turning the liquor from a deep green to a milky, iridescent shade. At left, a classic pour. At right, an absinthe glass fitted with a brouilleur, a device that holds the ice and lets water slowly drip down. Courtesy of Scott MacDonald hide caption

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Before distilleries used glass bottles, many of them offered liquor stores branded ceramic jugs that could be filled and sold to customers. This pair of George Dickel jugs was used around 1900. From The Art of American Whiskey by Noah Rothbaum. Courtesy of Ten Speed Press/Diageo hide caption

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Art of the people: Fill a glass with hope, a butter sculpture crafted by Jim Victor and Marie Pelton. "People don't understand how [the sculpting] is done --€” it's like magic and just appears," Victor says. "But people understand butter." Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton hide caption

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Jackson Pollock cooks with his wife, the artist Lee Krasner, and his mother, Stella Pollock, in the kitchen of his home in Springs, in East Hampton, N.Y., 1950. Courtesy Pollock‑Krasner House and Study Center hide caption

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Planet: bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons: bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars: salt, cinnamon, baking powder, Tums. Navid Baraty hide caption

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Fruit by Nike is a piece by designer Peddy Mergui in his exhibit "Wheat is Wheat is Wheat," next on display in May at Expo Milano 2015. Courtesy of Peddy Mergui hide caption

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Brittanie Reed and her mother, Wendy Fitt, the two pastry chefs behind Snickety Snacks, took their inspiration for these sugar cookies from a series of Beatles finger puppets by the artist Hanasaurusrex. Abram Landes/Courtesy of Snickety Snacks hide caption

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Rebecca Weld (aka The Cookie Architect) nabbed the Oscar of the cookie world for this series of Nantucket-themed biscuits. Courtesy of Rebecca Weld via Cookie Connection hide caption

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Freshly Baked Art: Cookies That Are A Feast For The Eyes

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A hotdog and ice cream cone from Beth Galton and Charlotte Omnes' "Cut Food" series. Courtesy of Beth Galton hide caption

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Broccoli Mower: "Douglas stubbornly refused to accept his wife's opinion that he had let the lawn go too long without attention." Christopher Boffoli/Courtesy Workman Publishing hide caption

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The 7-Day Color Diet: An attempt to get people to eat more fruits and vegetables, this diet requires followers to eat foods of just a single color each day. It ends with a day in which you "eat the rainbow," so to speak. Here's Gonot's cheeky take on orange day. Stephanie Gonot/Courtesy of the photographer hide caption

toggle caption Stephanie Gonot/Courtesy of the photographer