AJS made these cone-headed taps for Stevens Point Brewery in Wisconsin. Courtesy of Olivia Locascio Film and Photo hide caption

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Courtesy of Olivia Locascio Film and Photo

Arts And Craft Beers: Brewers Draw Drinkers' Eyes With Snazzy Tap Handles

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Caption from @emptyplatesofny: "I wouldn't say that I'm famous, but Brad Pitt has eaten off me before..." — Clint, West Village; Delicious banana nut bread Courtesy of Brandon Scott Wolf hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Scott Wolf

The Oculus cake now being sold by the new caterer running the SFMOMA's upstairs cafe. The cake was inspired by the distinctive tower at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. It is similar in design and spirit to a cake prepared by Caitlin Freeman and her baking team for a museum event several years ago. (See below.) Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle hide caption

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Connor Radnovich/ Courtesy of The San Francisco Chronicle

Object (or Luncheon in Fur), by Meret Oppenheim. In 1936, Oppenheim wrapped a teacup, saucer and spoon in fur. In the age of Freud, a gastro-sexual interpretation was inescapable. Even today, the work triggers intense reactions. Flavia Brandi/Flickr hide caption

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Flavia Brandi/Flickr

Llapingacho is one of Marcella Kriebel's favorite recipes from her travels. It is an Ecuadorian cheese-stuffed potato pancake. Juxtaposed is causa, a Peruvian dish of layered potato, shrimp and avocado. Marcella Kriebel hide caption

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Marcella Kriebel

From left: Sodium benzoate, azodicarbonamide, shellac. The images are from Ingredients: A Visual Exploration of 75 Additives & 25 Food Products. Dwight Eschliman/Regan Arts hide caption

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Dwight Eschliman/Regan Arts

Kumu (sp. Parupeneus porphyreus). The Whitesaddle Goatfish has a special place in Hawaiian culture. In ancient Hawaii, the fish were used in offerings to the gods. Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada hide caption

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Courtesy of Derek Yoshinori Wada

Le louche refers to the transformation that happens when water is added to absinthe, turning the liquor from a deep green to a milky, iridescent shade. At left, a classic pour. At right, an absinthe glass fitted with a brouilleur, a device that holds the ice and lets water slowly drip down. Courtesy of Scott MacDonald hide caption

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Courtesy of Scott MacDonald

Before distilleries used glass bottles, many of them offered liquor stores branded ceramic jugs that could be filled and sold to customers. This pair of George Dickel jugs was used around 1900. From The Art of American Whiskey by Noah Rothbaum. Courtesy of Ten Speed Press/Diageo hide caption

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Courtesy of Ten Speed Press/Diageo

Art of the people: Fill a glass with hope, a butter sculpture crafted by Jim Victor and Marie Pelton. "People don't understand how [the sculpting] is done --€” it's like magic and just appears," Victor says. "But people understand butter." Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton hide caption

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Courtesy of Jim Victor and Marie Pelton