Think your prime rib holiday dinner is more pricey this year? You're right. But maybe not for the reason you think. Todd Patterson/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption Todd Patterson/iStockphoto.com

Drought, Economics And Your Holiday Feast

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Farm worker Jesus Francisco Cayetano feeds pigs a slop made from food scraps from casinos near North Las Vegas, Nev. in 2006. Isaac Brekken/AP hide caption

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These piglets on the Hardin farm in Danville, Ind., are going to cost more to feed than they will fetch at market. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Meat Producers And, Ultimately, Consumers Hurt By Drought

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