A minivan drives past a portrait of Syrian President Bashar Assad in Damascus last week. U.S. forces fired a barrage of cruise missiles at a Syrian air base Thursday in response to what President Trump called a "barbaric" chemical attack he blamed on the Assad regime. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

White House press secretary Sean Spicer answers reporters' questions during the daily news conference at the White House on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White House Spokesman Stumbles Over Assad-Hitler Comparison

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A still from a video released by the U.S. Navy on Thursday evening shows the guided-missile destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78) as it conducts strike operations while in the Mediterranean Sea. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams hide caption

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U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ford Williams

Syrian residents of Khan Shaykhun hold signs and pictures on Friday during a protest condemning a suspected chemical weapons attack on their town earlier this week. Omar Haj Kadour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Haj Kadour/AFP/Getty Images

In Syria, The News Of U.S. Missile Strike Is Greeted With Ambivalence

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A picture taken Friday shows the damaged Shayrat airfield at the Syrian military base targeted overnight by U.S. Tomahawk cruise missiles, southeast of the central Syrian city of Homs. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Experts in Turkey did autopsies on Wednesday on Syrians killed Tuesday in Idlib. Turkish Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag said results show they were subjected to chemical weapons in the attack by Syrian government forces. DHA-Depo Photos via AP hide caption

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DHA-Depo Photos via AP

A survivor of the suspected chemical attack receives treatment at a hospital in Khan Shaykhun on Wednesday. Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A Syrian child is treated at a hospital in the town of Maaret al-Noman after a suspected chemical attack on April 4. Mohamed Al-Bakour /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed Al-Bakour /AFP/Getty Images

A Syrian man receives treatment following a suspected toxic chemical attack Tuesday in Khan Shaykhun, a rebel-held town in Syria's northwestern Idlib province. At least 72 people were killed, including a number of children. Mohamed al-Bakour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed al-Bakour/AFP/Getty Images

An instructor at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., carries VX nerve agent inside a special chamber used for training in 2003. Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

VX: The Nerve Agent Used To Kill Kim Jong Nam Is Rare And Deadly

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A video released by the White Helmets, a team of volunteer rescue workers, shows men hosing down civilians after the reported chlorine gas attack Tuesday in Aleppo, Syria. White Helmets/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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White Helmets/Screenshot by NPR

Civil defense workers wear gas masks near damaged ground in a village near the Syrian city of Idlib in May. Activists said there had been a chlorine attack. Abed Kontar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Abed Kontar/Reuters/Landov

In Syria, Chlorine Attacks Continue To Take A Toll

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A U.S. Air Force C-123 sprays herbicides on dense jungle beside a South Vietnamese highway on May 18, 1966. This aircraft is the last in a formation of three. Spray from the other two planes can be seen ahead. U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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U.S. Air Force via AP

Air Force Reservists Say Agent Orange Residue Damaged Their Health

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Melissa Downer and her family moved to Camp Minden, La., 11 years ago and live on three acres. The mother of three young daughters says they'll move if the M6 is burned in the open air. Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio hide caption

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Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio

EPA Push For Massive Munitions Burn Ignites Opposition In Louisiana

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Soldier of U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Brigade prior to an air analysis mission near an oil and gas separation plant at the Baba Gurgur oil field outside northern Iraq's town of Kirkuk in May 2003. Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters/Landov

A United Nations vehicle carrying inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons leaves a hotel in Damascus last fall. Louai Behara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Behara/AFP/Getty Images