A U.S. Air Force C-123 sprays herbicides on dense jungle beside a South Vietnamese highway on May 18, 1966. This aircraft is the last in a formation of three. Spray from the other two planes can be seen ahead. U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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Air Force Reservists Say Agent Orange Residue Damaged Their Health

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Melissa Downer and her family moved to Camp Minden, La., 11 years ago and live on three acres. The mother of three young daughters says they'll move if the M6 is burned in the open air. Kate Archer Kent/Red River Radio hide caption

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EPA Push For Massive Munitions Burn Ignites Opposition In Louisiana

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Soldier of U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Brigade prior to an air analysis mission near an oil and gas separation plant at the Baba Gurgur oil field outside northern Iraq's town of Kirkuk in May 2003. Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A United Nations vehicle carrying inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons leaves a hotel in Damascus last fall. Louai Behara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Syrian woman cries as she leaves a residential block in Aleppo, Syria, reportedly hit by an explosives-filled barrel dropped by a government forces helicopter on March 18. Khaled Khatib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Syria Gives Up Chemical Weapons ... But A War Rages On

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Norwegian marines patrol the waters around the Norwegian frigate HNOMS Helge Ingstad, which was docked in Cyprus over the weekend. The frigate, and the Danish warship HDMS Esbern Snare, will escort Danish and Norwegian cargo ships transporting Syria's most dangerous chemical weapons. Pavlos Vrionides/AP hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': Tom Goldman explains how chemicals will be removed from Syria

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If a plan taking shape is finalized, the MV Cape Ray, managed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, will be turned into a floating chemical weapons disposal plant. U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration hide caption

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Plan Calls For Syria's Chemical Arsenal To Be Destroyed At Sea

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In the northern Syrian city of Aleppo last month, there was a class about how to protect against chemical weapons attacks. J.M. Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA Thursday shows an international expert working at a chemical weapons plant in Syria. Destroying the weapons safely may require them to be moved to another country, experts say. AP hide caption

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Hear Geoff Brumfiel on 'Weekend Edition'

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U.N. chemical weapons experts carry samples collected on Aug. 28 from a site of an alleged chemical weapons attack near the Syrian capital Damascus. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which is dismantling Syria's chemical weapons stockpile, was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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A United Nations vehicle carrying inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) leaves a hotel in Damascus, on Wednesday. Some 19 OPCW arms experts are in Syria and have started to destroy weapons production facilities. Louai Behara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A convoy of chemical weapons disarmament experts depart the Four Seasons Hotel in Damascus, Syria, on Tuesday. A second team of experts will soon join mission to destroy Syria's chemical program. AP hide caption

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