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An Addict, Now Clean, Discusses Needle Exchanges And 'Hope After Heroin'

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Austin, Indiana's needle exchange program is open for business this week, but health workers worry the program will be tough to quickly replicate in other counties. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Indiana Struggles To Control HIV Outbreak Linked To Injected Drug Use

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Volunteer Patrick Pezzati searches yards in Turners Falls, Mass., for discarded heroin needles. Karen Brown/WFCR hide caption

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A Rural Police Chief Asks Citizens To Help Pick Up Used Syringes

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Needle exchange programs, like this one in Portland, Maine, offer free, sterile syringes and needles to drug users. The programs save money and lives, health officials say, by curtailing the spread of bloodborne infections, such as hepatitis and HIV. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Indiana's HIV Spike Prompts New Calls For Needle Exchanges Statewide

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In Philadelphia, some drug users are selling clean needles from needle exchange programs on the street. Researchers say the black market isn't necessarily a bad thing. ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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Needle Exchange Program Creates Black Market In Clean Syringes

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A heroin user keeps a syringe tucked behind his ear at a park in the city of Medan on Indonesia's Sumatra island. Cordita-Caritas Medan, a nongovernmental organization active there, works to reduce HIV infections through rehab of drug users and a needle exchange program. Sutanta Aditya/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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