A first responder in the rebel-held city of Aleppo carries a child who was wounded in a government airstrike on Sept. 16. Karam Al-Masri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Satellite photo made available by Amnesty International on Wednesday of the Jabal Badro area of Aleppo, Syria, before a ballistic missile strike on Feb. 18 that reportedly killed scores of residents. AP hide caption

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Robert Ford, the State Department's point man on Syria policy, appears before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on April 11. Michael Reynolds/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Syrians carry a large revolution flag and chant slogans during a protest in Aleppo, Syria, where young people and children sang songs against President Bashar Assad and the Syrian regime, Dec. 21, 2012. Virginie Nguyen Hoang/AP hide caption

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Three suicide car bombings rocked the center of Aleppo in northern Syria on Wednesday, killing dozens and causing extensive damage. SANA/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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The Two-Way

Turkey Fires On Northern Syria In Response To Rocket Attack

The city is divided after months of fighting. In the latest attack, dozens were killed in suicide bombings that appear to be the work of rebels.

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One-year-old Hassan was discovered in the rubble of an apartment building in Aleppo, Syria, giving his rescuers a moment of hope on a sad day. His parents were killed by the helicopter strike. Global Post hide caption

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Anti-Assad fighters stood atop a captured army tank on Wednesday in the village of Anadan, about 4 miles northwest of Aleppo. Ahmad Gharabli /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way

In Syria, Both Sides Now Have Heavy Weapons In Aleppo

As fighting intensifies in the Syrian city, there are fears about the deadly consequences for civilians.

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Free Syrian Army fighters are seen in the Syrian town of Azaz, some 20 miles north of Aleppo, on Tuesday. Turkpix/AP hide caption

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