Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College

Mobile Internet "hot spot" devices are now the most popular item at the Spring Hill Library in Tennessee. Courtesy of the Spring Hill Library hide caption

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Courtesy of the Spring Hill Library

For Internet To Go, Check The Library

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More than 600 Porto city buses and taxis have been fitted with routers to provide free Wi-Fi service. It's being touted as the biggest Wi-Fi-in-motion network in the world. Sérgio Rodrigues/Veniam hide caption

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Sérgio Rodrigues/Veniam

Free Wi-Fi On Buses Offers A Link To Future Of 'Smart Cities'

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There is a hole in mobile security that could makes tens of millions of Americans vulnerable. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Here's One Big Way Your Mobile Phone Could Be Open To Hackers

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A TrackingPoint rifle features a high-tech scope that includes a laser rangefinder and a Wi-Fi server. Courtesy of TrackingPoint hide caption

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Courtesy of TrackingPoint

A New 'Smart Rifle' Decides When To Shoot And Rarely Misses

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A phone booth serves as a free Wi-Fi hot spot in New York City's Columbus Circle. Anna Solo/ hide caption

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Anna Solo/

Want Free Wi-Fi In New York? Get Near A Pay Phone

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