This computer-simulated image shows a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy. The cosmic monster's powerful gravity distorts space around it like the mirror in a fun house, smearing the light from nearby stars. NASA/ESA/D. Coe, J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (Space Telescope Science Institute) hide caption

toggle caption NASA/ESA/D. Coe, J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (Space Telescope Science Institute)

Supermassive Black Holes May Be More Common Than Anyone Imagined

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The imagined view from Planet Nine back toward the sun. Astronomers think the huge, distant planet is likely gaseous, similar to Uranus and Neptune. Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) hide caption

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Scientists Find Hints Of A Giant, Hidden Planet In Our Solar System

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Physics is full of big, interesting questions about phenomenon such as black holes. This illustration shows the supermassive black hole at the heart of the active galaxy NGC 3783 in the southern constellation of Centaurus. M. Kornmesser/ESO hide caption

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If Gravity carries a clear message, it is that the universe is hostile to life. Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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