Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR
So, You Have Gonorrhea. Who Tells Your Ex?
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A public health poster from 1952 encourages Americans to get checked for sexually transmitted diseases. Gonorrhea is the second-most-common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 300,000 cases reported in 2011. Images from the History of Medicine hide caption

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In the U.S., doctors no longer have the option of treating gonorrhea with a pill. Instead, they are advised to use an injectable antibiotic, which is still effective against the bacteria. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease
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