A team of pediatricians noticed that many of their young black and Hispanic patients were deficient in vitamin D. A hefty weekly dose of of the vitamin for two months was needed to get most of the teens' blood levels to the concentration that endocrinologists advise. Noel Hendrickson/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Farming helped fuel the rise of civilizations, but it may also have given us less robust bones. Leemage/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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When Humans Quit Hunting And Gathering, Their Bones Got Wimpy

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If only it was as simple as popping a supplement and being set for life. But alas, no. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Federal health officials recommend 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day for people younger than 50, but some are overdoing it. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Too Much Calcium Could Cause Kidney, Heart Problems, Researchers Say

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