Troy Hodge was only 41 years old when a vessel in his brain burst. "You don't think of things you can't do until you can't do them," he says. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Strokes On The Rise Among Younger Adults

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That black triangle icon is a sodium warning label next to a dish on the menu at an Applebee's in New York City. Starting Tuesday, the city's Health Department is requiring chain restaurants with 15 or more locations to display the salt shaker icon next to menu items containing 2,300 mg or more of sodium — the recommended daily limit. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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High-Sodium Warnings Hit New York City Menus

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A landmark federal study was halted when early results showed that lowering patients' top blood pressure number to 120 or lower led to dramatic reductions in heart disease and deaths. iStockphoto hide caption

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Aggressively Lowering Blood Pressure Saves Lives, Study Finds

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For all the good aspirin can do in preventing second heart attacks and strokes, taking it daily can boost some risks, too — of ulcers, for example, and of bleeding in the brain or gut. iStockphoto hide caption

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Maybe You Should Rethink That Daily Aspirin

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A third of Americans have high blood pressure, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Half of them don't have it under control. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Reducing dietary salt and alcohol, exercising, not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight are other lifestyle tweaks known to help prevent or reduce high blood pressure, doctors say. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Study Hints Vitamin D Might Help Curb High Blood Pressure

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The use of multiple blood pressure medications may be helping some Americans bring their hypertension under control. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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