Memory athletes like Sue Jin Yang — competing here in the 17th annual USA Memory Championship in New York City in 2014 — wear headphones to block out distractions as they memorize the order of decks of cards. Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images

Maybe You, Too, Could Become A Super Memorizer

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Poetry Keep You Young? Science Is Still Out, But The Heart Says Yes

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them

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Zap! Magnet Study Offers Fresh Insights Into How Memory Works

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Comparative psychologist Claudia Fugazza and her dog demonstrate the "Do As I Do" method of exploring canine memory. Mirko Lui/Cell Press hide caption

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Mirko Lui/Cell Press

Your Dog Remembers Every Move You Make

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Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images

A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain

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A Judge's Guidance Makes Jurors Suspicious Of Any Eyewitness

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Forgot Something Again? It's Probably Just Normal Aging

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Teresa Valko and her mother, Evelyn Wilson, in 2011. Courtesy of Teresa Valko hide caption

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Courtesy of Teresa Valko

Conversations Turn Into Monologues As Alzheimer's Robs Family Of Memories

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The Brain's GPS May Also Help Us Map Our Memories

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"My brain used to be my best friend," says Greg O'Brien, a journalist with early onset Alzheimer's. But he can't trust it anymore, he says. Alzheimer's is, in some ways, changing who he is. Amanda Kowalski and Samantha Broun for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Kowalski and Samantha Broun for NPR

Can playing the Project Evo game really improve the brain's ability to deal with distractions? Its manufacturer thinks so. Courtesy of Akili hide caption

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Courtesy of Akili

'Play This Video Game And Call Me In The Morning'

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Will Doctors Soon Be Prescribing Video Games For Mental Health?

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Trying To Remember Multiple Things May Be The Best Way To Forget Them

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How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked The Car

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Engaging, mentally stimulating work is good for the brain, scientists say, whether you get paid to do it or not. Running a household can be as mentally demanding as running a company. iStockphoto hide caption

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