The Star-Spangled Banner — the flag that inspired our National Anthem — on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Hugh Talman/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History hide caption

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Debra Jenson, 2, hanging from a hook in her grandmother's kitchen. "Over the next 35 years, I watched each of my cousins, then my own children and my cousins' children be dangled from that hook. Between the photo and watching it happen to others, this is a powerful 'fake memory' for me." Debra Jenson/Instagram hide caption

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Seniors who learned more difficult skills like digital photography and Photoshop showed the greatest improvement in memory. Courtesy of UT Dallas hide caption

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Learning A New Skill Works Best To Keep Your Brain Sharp

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Francis Csedrik remembers details of being bonked hard on the head when he was 4, and having to go to the emergency room. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

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The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade

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The brain edits memories of the past, updating them with new information. Scientists say this may help us function better in the present. But don't throw those photos away. iStockphoto hide caption

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Researchers have only recently been able to use brain scans to detect Alzheimer's risk factors in living people. iStockphoto hide caption

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Having a perfect memory can put a strain on relationships, because every slight is remembered. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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When Memories Never Fade, The Past Can Poison The Present

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Brain Cells 'Geotag' Memories To Cache What Happened — And Where

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Playing this game won't make you feel older, unless you're already getting up there in age. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Mom loved him. You love him. Prince performing in 1985. Ron Wolfson/Landov hide caption

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Top hits 1980-1984 from the study: can you name them?

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The underlying biology of age-related memory glitches — in old mice and old people — is different from what happens with Alzheimer's, recent research suggests. Anthony Bradshaw/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A Single Protein May Help Explain Memory Loss In Old Age

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Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer. Samantha Murphy for NPR hide caption

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Inside The Brains Of People Over 80 With Exceptional Memory

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