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Engaging, mentally stimulating work is good for the brain, scientists say, whether you get paid to do it or not. Running a household can be as mentally demanding as running a company. iStockphoto hide caption

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Scent Bar, in central Los Angeles, is home to over 700 niche fragrances — several of which are neatly arranged here. Courtesy of LuckyScent hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of LuckyScent

Opening statements are delivered in June 1990 in the Central Park rape trial in New York in this artist's rendering. The defendants — including Yusef Salaam (from left), Antron McCray and Raymond Santana, shown here — were convicted and imprisoned in part on what were later found to be false confessions. A new study shows it's surprisingly easy to implant memories of committing a crime. Marilyn Church/AP hide caption

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When he was 59 years old, Greg O'Brien was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Five years later, he is speaking publicly about his experience, even as his symptoms worsen. Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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The Star-Spangled Banner — the flag that inspired our National Anthem — on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Hugh Talman/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History hide caption

itoggle caption Hugh Talman/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Debra Jenson, 2, hanging from a hook in her grandmother's kitchen. "Over the next 35 years, I watched each of my cousins, then my own children and my cousins' children be dangled from that hook. Between the photo and watching it happen to others, this is a powerful 'fake memory' for me." Debra Jenson/Instagram hide caption

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Seniors who learned more difficult skills like digital photography and Photoshop showed the greatest improvement in memory. Courtesy of UT Dallas hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of UT Dallas

Francis Csedrik remembers details of being bonked hard on the head when he was 4, and having to go to the emergency room. Meg Vogel/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Meg Vogel/NPR