memory memory

Rats and people may rely on "metamemory" in a variety of different ways, scientists say. For a rat, it's likely about knowing whether you remember that predator in the distance; for people, knowing what we don't know helps us navigate social interactions. fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Rats To Humans, A Brain Knows When It Can't Remember

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Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight years ago, Greg was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Alzheimer's Starts To Steal The Joy Of Being A Grandfather

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Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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Memory athletes like Sue Jin Yang — competing here in the 17th annual USA Memory Championship in New York City in 2014 — wear headphones to block out distractions as they memorize the order of decks of cards. Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images

Maybe You, Too, Could Become A Super Memorizer

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Poetry Keep You Young? Science Is Still Out, But The Heart Says Yes

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them

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Zap! Magnet Study Offers Fresh Insights Into How Memory Works

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Comparative psychologist Claudia Fugazza and her dog demonstrate the "Do As I Do" method of exploring canine memory. Mirko Lui/Cell Press hide caption

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Mirko Lui/Cell Press

Your Dog Remembers Every Move You Make

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Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images

A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

What's Good For The Heart Is Good For The Brain

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A Judge's Guidance Makes Jurors Suspicious Of Any Eyewitness

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Todd Davidson/Getty Images/Illustration Works

Forgot Something Again? It's Probably Just Normal Aging

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