Mimi Sheraton is no fan of kale chips, shown here at Elizabeth's Gone Raw on May 20, 2011 in Washington, D.C. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Kill The Culture Of Cool Kale, Food Critic Says

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Alaria, a type of seaweed also known as "Wild Atlantic Wakame," grows in the North Atlantic Ocean and is similar to Japanese wakame, a common ingredient in miso soup. Courtesy of Sarah Redmond hide caption

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Kale and Brussels sprouts got together and conceived a new vegetable, kalette. Look for it on menus in 2015. Rain Rabbit/Flickr hide caption

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A Cuppa Matcha With Your Crickets? On The Menu In 2015

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Kalettes, BrusselKale, Lollipop Kale and Flower Sprout: This little vegetable, a cross of kale and Brussels sprouts, goes by a lot of names. Rain Rabbit/Flickr hide caption

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The Romanesco broccoli in the upper left corner is part of the brassica family, just like these colorful cauliflower varieties. Sang An/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press hide caption

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Instead of throwing out the nutritious broth that's left over when you cook down greens, why not use it as the base for a delicious dish like this rockfish with clams in a garlic-shallot pot liquor sauce? Alison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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