NATO on Thursday ordered a naval force to move immediately to the Aegean Sea to help end the deadly smuggling of migrants between Turkey and Greece. In this photo from last June, a Greek coast guard vessel arrives carrying migrants at the port of Mytilene, Greece, after a rescue operation. Thanassis Stavrakis/AP hide caption

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Children from a refugee camp in the Dutch city of Nijmegen arrive for their first day of school last month. Robin Van Lonkhuijsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Danish policeman checks passengers' identity papers on a train arriving from Germany on Jan. 6. Officials say the small country is overwhelmed by the number of refugees seeking asylum. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Danish police conduct spot checks on incoming traffic from Germany at a highway border crossing near Padborg, Denmark, on Jan. 6. Officials say they've been overwhelmed by the 20,000 asylum seekers who came to Denmark last year. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Osama Abdul Mohsen holds his son Zaid as they arrive at the Barcelona train station on Sept. 16, 2015. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Somalis living in the Dadaab camp in Kenya gather to watch the arrival of the United Nations high commissioner for refugees last May. Tony Karumba /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Goats and Soda

The World's Largest Refugee Camp Looks Like A Slum/Star Wars Mashup

But for thousands of Somali refugees, the camp in Dadaab, Kenya, is the only home they've ever known.

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A boy is carried ashore moments after his arrival with other Syrian and Iraqi migrants on the island of Lesbos from Turkey on October 14, 2015 in Sikaminias, Greece. A recent piece in Scientific American highlights the connection between the Syrian refugee crisis and Syria's recent drought. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Three migrants from Afghanistan walk along the A3 highway shortly after they crossed into Germany on August 30, 2015, near Neuhaus am Inn, Germany. Police detained them shortly after and took them to a registration center for asylum seekers. Germany has welcomed many refugees — but now is discouraging Afghans who are seeking better economic prospects. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomed Syrian refugees arriving from Beirut at the Toronto airport last week. Mark Blinch/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Members of Berlin's recently formed Begegnungschor Choir (Getting To Know You Choir) rehearse. The 50-person choir is made up equally of Germans and asylum seekers, who are from Syria and Eritrea. Esme Nicholson for NPR hide caption

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Radwan Mahmoud, a Syrian refugee, works as a laborer on a construction site in Lebanon. He's supporting 12 family members and earning about $16 a day. With a population of just over 4 million, Lebanon is host to more than 1 million Syrian refugees. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Parallels

As War Drags On, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Sink Into Debt Trap

Barred from legal work in Lebanon, Syrian refugees are accumulating huge debts as they struggle to pay for rent and other necessities.

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Members of The Syrian People Solidarity Group protest on Nov. 22 in Austin, Texas, after Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced he'd refuse to allow Syrian refugees in the state. Texas and the U.S. government are now clashing in court over the issue. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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