Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 is demonstrated in New York on July 28. All owners of the new smartphone have been urged to exchange the device after reports of phones' exploding or catching fire. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Drew/AP

Chris Bettinger poses for a portrait with the edible battery his team designed at Carnegie Mellon University. Stephanie Strasburg/Tribune-Review hide caption

toggle caption
Stephanie Strasburg/Tribune-Review

About 14 percent of the Gigafactory in Nevada has been built so far. At 5.8 million square feet, it will be a building with one of the biggest footprints in the world. Tesla hide caption

toggle caption
Tesla

A Rare Look Inside The 'Gigafactory' Tesla Hopes Will Revolutionize Energy Use

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474346868/474725641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The plastic sheet invented by Stanford University chemical engineer Zhenan Bao and her colleagues can be inserted in lithium-ion batteries to avoid overheating. Zheng Chen/Courtesy of Zhenan Bao hide caption

toggle caption
Zheng Chen/Courtesy of Zhenan Bao

Batteries With A Less Fiery Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463181927/463680975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jim and Lyn Schneider installed solar panels and batteries because bringing grid power to their house in central Wyoming was going to cost around $80,000. Leigh Paterson/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Leigh Paterson/Wyoming Public Radio

When Relying On The Sun, Energy Storage Remains Out Of Reach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/427734398/429385946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Smart watches based on Qualcomm chipsets are displayed at CES — but do consumers want them? Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jae C. Hong/AP

Forget Wearable Tech. People Really Want Better Batteries.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/376166180/376381122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A prototype of a flexible battery from Imprint Energy, one of 40 companies working on battery technology in the San Francisco Bay Area. Imprint Energy hide caption

toggle caption
Imprint Energy

Electric Cars Drive Demand For Cheaper, More Powerful Batteries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/245060918/245257906" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Electric Car Review Dust-Up May Put Brakes On Tesla Profits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/171824617/171842620" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript