Angelica Pereira feeds her daughter Luiza, who was born with microcephaly, at her mother's house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Zika Virus Can Cause Brain Defects In Babies, CDC Confirms

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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger

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A woman who is six months pregnant shows a photo of her ultrasound at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on Wednesday. Scientists are trying to figure out how Zika virus may be affecting fetuses. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Study Finds Multiple Problems In Fetuses Exposed To Zika Virus

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Mylene Helena Ferraira of Recife, Brazil, carries her 5-month-old son, David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly. She's returning home after a medical visit. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC Arrives In Brazil To Investigate Zika Outbreak

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Dr. Margaret Chan is director-general of the World Health Organization. In her first major address on Zika, delivered Thursday in Geneva, she said: "Questions abound. We need to get some answers quickly." Sandro Campardo//epa/Corbis hide caption

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U.S. health officials are telling pregnant women to avoid travel to Latin America and Caribbean countries with outbreaks of Zika, a tropical illness linked to birth defects. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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The FDA worries that the same alkaline treatment that gives corn masa its distinctive aroma and flavor might also prevent folic acid from remaining stable in masa. The agency is currently reviewing test results looking at the question of stability. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Health inspectors collect samples of mosquito larvae from standing water in a garden in a middle-class neighborhood in the north of Rio de Janeiro. They are searching for places where the Aedes aegypti mosquito breeds — that's the one that carries Zika virus. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Why Brazil Doesn't Want Women In The Northeast To Become Pregnant

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Omar looks through Kai's photo book. The charges for the infant's six months of care in the neonatal intensive care unit totaled about $11 million, according to the family, though their insurer very likely negotiated a lower rate. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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An Ill Newborn, A Loving Family And A Litany Of Wrenching Choices

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Solid information on the risks of medications during pregnancy is often hard to come by. iStockphoto hide caption

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Some Antidepressants May Pose Increased Risk Of Birth Defects

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Ultrasound is often used for prenatal screening. It's just one of several prenatal screenings available to pregnant women. iStockphoto hide caption

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DNA Blood Test Gives Women A New Option For Prenatal Screening

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Jake and Natalie Peterson and their son Garrett in October 2014. Courtesy of Brittany Jacox hide caption

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Baby Thrives Once 3-D-Printed Windpipe Helps Him Breathe

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Alice Snyder, with her parents Mary and Ryan, during a checkup with Dr. John Herzenberg, who treated her clubfoot without surgery. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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How Parents And The Internet Transformed Clubfoot Treatment

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