Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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Eight months pregnant, Mara Torres stands next to a mosquito net placed over her bed in Cali, Colombia. Health officials in Cali have delivered mosquito nets to pregnant women to help protect them from the bites of mosquitoes that can transmit dengue, chikungunya or Zika. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zika Infection Late In Pregnancy Carries Little Risk of Microcephaly

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Tracy Smith, 38, and her children Hazel, 8, and Finley, 5, at their home in Houston. Smith is pregnant with twins and says she's a little more worried than usual about the approach of mosquito season. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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In Houston, Pregnant Women And Their Doctors Weigh Risks Of Zika

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The FDA says tortillas and other foods made with corn masa flour can now be fortified with folic acid. The move is aimed at reducing severe brain and spinal cord defects in babies born to Hispanic women. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Angelica Pereira feeds her daughter Luiza, who was born with microcephaly, at her mother's house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Zika Virus Can Cause Brain Defects In Babies, CDC Confirms

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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger

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A woman who is six months pregnant shows a photo of her ultrasound at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on Wednesday. Scientists are trying to figure out how Zika virus may be affecting fetuses. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Study Finds Multiple Problems In Fetuses Exposed To Zika Virus

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Mylene Helena Ferraira of Recife, Brazil, carries her 5-month-old son, David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly. She's returning home after a medical visit. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC Arrives In Brazil To Investigate Zika Outbreak

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Dr. Margaret Chan is director-general of the World Health Organization. In her first major address on Zika, delivered Thursday in Geneva, she said: "Questions abound. We need to get some answers quickly." Sandro Campardo//epa/Corbis hide caption

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U.S. health officials are telling pregnant women to avoid travel to Latin America and Caribbean countries with outbreaks of Zika, a tropical illness linked to birth defects. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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The FDA worries that the same alkaline treatment that gives corn masa its distinctive aroma and flavor might also prevent folic acid from remaining stable in masa. The agency is currently reviewing test results looking at the question of stability. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Health inspectors collect samples of mosquito larvae from standing water in a garden in a middle-class neighborhood in the north of Rio de Janeiro. They are searching for places where the Aedes aegypti mosquito breeds — that's the one that carries Zika virus. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Why Brazil Doesn't Want Women In The Northeast To Become Pregnant

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