Anita Krajnc speaks onstage during a 2016 Humane Society event in Hollywood, Calif. Angela Weiss/Getty Images for The Humane Society Of The United States hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/Getty Images for The Humane Society Of The United States

Pig farm workers push live pigs into a large grave in Nipah in 1999. To stop the outbreak, the Malaysian government culled almost 1 million pigs, nearly destroying the country's pork industry. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andy Wong/AP

A Taste For Pork Helped A Deadly Virus Jump To Humans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515258818/517181485" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This wild hog from Hawaii was raised at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins, Colo. Feral pigs in the wild tend to eat anything containing a calorie — from rows of corn to sea turtle eggs, to baby deer and goats. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

Scientists Get Down And Dirty With DNA To Track Wild Pigs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507475723/513857968" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A screenshot from the video of the incident posted by Toronto Pig Save, which shows Anita Krajnc giving water to pigs bound for the slaughterhouse. Toronto Pig Save/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Toronto Pig Save/Screenshot by NPR

The antibiotic resistant bacteria have been found in pigs, pork and people in China. This pig is from a farm on the outskirts of Beijing. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

E. Coli Bacteria Can Transfer Antibiotic Resistance To Other Bacteria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456689272/456752044" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Young pigs stare out of a pen at a hog farm in North Dakota. In coming months, consumers will start to see a new label on some packages of pork: Produced "without the use of ractopamine." Will Kincaid/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Will Kincaid/AP

A Muscle Drug For Pigs Comes Out Of The Shadows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/432102733/432192451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Author Barry Estabrook says pigs can be taught to play computer games and recognize themselves in a mirror. W. W. Norton & Company hide caption

toggle caption
W. W. Norton & Company

'Tales' Of Pig Intelligence, Factory Farming And Humane Bacon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402584436/404446189" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers prepare burritos at a Chipotle Mexican Grill in New York. The restaurant chain has stopped serving pork in about one-third of its U.S. locations. Richard Levine/Demotix/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Levine/Demotix/Corbis

Chipotle's Pulled Pork Highlights Debate Over Sow Welfare

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/377760603/378409728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michael Yezzi raises 1,000 pigs a year in Shushan, N.Y. He's worried about how to keep his farm safe from a disease that has no proven cure. Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

As Pig Virus Spreads, The Price Of Pork Continues To Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/325529915/326062366" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

France has banned imports of live pigs and other products from the U.S. to keep out a virus that has killed more than 4 million pigs in the U.S. Here, young pigs look out of a pen at a North Dakota hog farm in a 2005 file photo. Will Kincaid/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Will Kincaid/AP

Piglets at Hilldale Farm in State Center, Iowa in March 2013, just before porcine epidemic diarrhea began spreading through hog farms in the U.S. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

In recent years, pork producers have found ways to keep the animals healthy through improved hygiene. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

toggle caption
M. Spencer Green/AP

Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/241603861/243056276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript