A Mexican soldier stands guard next to marijuana packages in Tijuana following the discovery of a tunnel under the U.S.-Mexico border in 2010. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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'Narconomics': How The Drug Cartels Operate Like Wal-Mart And McDonald's
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Top Official Says Inside Help Was Likely In 'El Chapo' Escape
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Maximum Security Not Enough As Mexican Drug Lord Stages Second Escape
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The alleged leader of the Zetas drug cartel, Omar Trevino Morales, is taken under custody to be presented to the press at the Attorney General Office's hangar at the airport in Mexico City, on March 4. Mexican authorities captured Trevino Wednesday, dealing a blow to the feared gang and giving the embattled government a second major arrest in a week. Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mexico Takes Out Cartel Heads, But Crime Continues To Climb
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Pablo Cote holds a photo of his deceased father of the same name in July 2013 in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cote was kidnapped while driving back from the U.S. border to the east-central state of Tlaxcala. He was beaten to death, part of the mass killing of 193 bus passengers and other travelers by the Zetas. Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP hide caption

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Groups of rural and community police arrive in the city of Iguala on Tuesday to help in the search for 43 students who disappeared after a confrontation with local police on Sept. 26. Miguel Tovar/STF/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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43 Missing Students, 1 Missing Mayor: Of Crime And Collusion In Mexico
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Reny Pineda was born in Michoacan, Mexico, but grew up in Los Angeles. In 2010 he returned to his homeland, and joined a vigilante battle against a ruthless cartel ruling the region. Now the Mexican government has ordered the civilian militias to disband, and Pineda picks lemons in this orchard. Alan Ortega /KQED hide caption

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Migrant Heads Home To Mexico — And Joins Fight Against Cartel
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Workers sort through key limes at a packaging house in Apatzingan, Michoacan. More than 90 percent of limes imported into the U.S. come from Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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With Cartels On The Run, Mexican Lime Farmers Keep More Of The Green
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Sept. 1, 2010: Police stood guard by a truck containing some of the bodies of immigrants killed by members of the Zetas drug cartel in Tamaulipas state. Jorge Dan/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Griselda Blanco, the "queen of cocaine," in a 2004 photo posted by the Florida Department of Corrections. Fla. Dept. of Corrections hide caption

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