Fernandina's Flicker (Colaptes fernandinae), a woodpecker found only in Cuba. Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis

The European eagle owl, like this one from the Mulhouse Zoo in eastern France, is one of the largest owl species, with a wingspan of about 6 feet. Sebastien Bozon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Sebastien Bozon/AFP/Getty Images

Bar-headed geese tend to follow the sharp ups and downs of the Himalayas as they migrate, research finds. John Downer/Nature Picture Library/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption John Downer/Nature Picture Library/Corbis

Recent research has shown that zebra finches sing differently when drunk, but not whether they know enough of the lyrics to get through "I Will Survive" or "Don't Stop Believin'." Liza Gross/Courtesy Public Library of Science hide caption

itoggle caption Liza Gross/Courtesy Public Library of Science

Recent research sequenced 48 bird species, including (from left) the budgerigar, the barn owl and the American flamingo. (Left and center)iStock; (Right) Chris Minerva/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption (Left and center)iStock; (Right) Chris Minerva/Ocean/Corbis

Shots - Health News

Birds Of A Feather Aren't Necessarily Related

Geneticists have revised the evolutionary tree of birds, revealing some unlikely relationships.

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A Baltimore oriole perches near apple blossoms in Mendota Heights, Minn. Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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A greater rhea grazes in a canola field near Utecht in northern Germany in 2012. A similar bird has been loose in the English countryside for the past month. DPA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Sandhill Crane flies in at sunset to roost for the night in the wetlands of the Monte Vista Wildlife Refuge in Colorado. Migrating along the same route they've followed for thousands of years, about 25,000 Greater Sandhill Cranes pass through the San Luis Valley in late winter every year. Doug Pensinger/Getty Images hide caption

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