Rain and radio towers in Austin, Texas. Scientists found that turning off steady beam lights on towers reduced bird fatalities by 70 percent. Cherry Bream/Flickr hide caption

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Cherry Bream/Flickr

How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights

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A great shearwater flies off the coast of Tasmania. John Harrison/Wikipedia hide caption

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John Harrison/Wikipedia

Why Seabirds Love To Gobble Plastic Floating In The Ocean

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On display at ZooAve Animal Rescue in Alajuela, Costa Rica, Grecia, the chestnut-mandibled toucan, can now eat on its own and sing with the new beak. Grecia was in rehabilitation for months after receiving a 3-D-printed nylon prosthesis. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

After Losing Half A Beak, Grecia The Toucan Becomes A Symbol Against Abuse

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Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a male greater honeyguide temporarily captured for research in the Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. The birds will flutter in front of people, tweet and fly from tree to tree to guide hunters to bees' nests that are hidden inside the trunks of hollow trees. This teamwork could date back thousands or even a million years. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

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Claire Spottiswoode

How Wild Birds Team Up With Humans To Guide Them To Honey

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One of the frigatebirds that researchers tagged soared 40 miles over the Indian Ocean without a wing-flap. These birds were photographed in the Galapagos. Lucy Rickards/Flickr hide caption

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Lucy Rickards/Flickr

Nonstop Flight: How The Frigatebird Can Soar For Weeks Without Stopping

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The prothonotary warbler can be found in the eastern United States. Flickr user John Jackson/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Flickr user John Jackson/Flickr Creative Commons

Nestpionage! And Other Feathered Curiosities From History

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Parakeets are among Colombia's 1,900 bird species. Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr hide caption

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Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr

As Colombia Grows Safer, Tourists — Especially Bird Lovers — Flock Back

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