A great shearwater flies off the coast of Tasmania. John Harrison/Wikipedia hide caption

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John Harrison/Wikipedia

Why Seabirds Love To Gobble Plastic Floating In The Ocean

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On display at ZooAve Animal Rescue in Alajuela, Costa Rica, Grecia, the chestnut-mandibled toucan, can now eat on its own and sing with the new beak. Grecia was in rehabilitation for months after receiving a 3-D-printed nylon prosthesis. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

After Losing Half A Beak, Grecia The Toucan Becomes A Symbol Against Abuse

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Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a male greater honeyguide temporarily captured for research in the Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. The birds will flutter in front of people, tweet and fly from tree to tree to guide hunters to bees' nests that are hidden inside the trunks of hollow trees. This teamwork could date back thousands or even a million years. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

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Claire Spottiswoode

How Wild Birds Team Up With Humans To Guide Them To Honey

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One of the frigatebirds that researchers tagged soared 40 miles over the Indian Ocean without a wing-flap. These birds were photographed in the Galapagos. Lucy Rickards/Flickr hide caption

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Lucy Rickards/Flickr

Nonstop Flight: How The Frigatebird Can Soar For Weeks Without Stopping

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The prothonotary warbler can be found in the eastern United States. Flickr user John Jackson/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Flickr user John Jackson/Flickr Creative Commons

Nestpionage! And Other Feathered Curiosities From History

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Parakeets are among Colombia's 1,900 bird species. Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr hide caption

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Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr

As Colombia Grows Safer, Tourists — Especially Bird Lovers — Flock Back

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The Tithe Barn at Avebury, owned by the U.K.'s National Trust, is home to a museum dedicated to the Avebury Henge. It's also now, unhappily, home to a very damaged thatched roof. The National Trust hide caption

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The National Trust

For 15 years, biologists in single-person, ultralight aircraft would each lead an experimental flock of young whooping cranes from Wisconsin to a winter home in Florida. But not anymore. Dave Umberger/AP hide caption

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Dave Umberger/AP

To Make A Wild Comeback, Cranes Need More Than Flying Lessons

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Starlings migrating in huge numbers come to roost this time of year in Rome. In the past, the city used special speakers that emit sounds of predators and starling distress calls to make the birds fly elsewhere. This year, falcons have been enlisted to drive the starlings out — without success. Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

Dodging Droppings, Romans Cope With Massive Influx Of Starlings

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The view at daybreak in Bosque del Apache, N.M. John Fowler/Flickr hide caption

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John Fowler/Flickr

What Does Daybreak Sound Like Where You Live?

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Squirrels closely mimic bird warning calls and help spread the alarm through the forest that hawks, owls or other predators are nearby. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Squirrels Mimic Bird Alarms To Foil The Enemy

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California condors have enormous wingspans. That's fine in the wilderness, but when a bird of this size encounters a power line, the results can be fatal. The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has a program to help train birds to avoid the hazard. Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr hide caption

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Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr

Small Shocks Help Enormous Birds Learn To Avoid Power Lines

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