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Parakeets are among Colombia's 1,900 bird species. Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr hide caption

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Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr

As Colombia Grows Safer, Tourists — Especially Bird Lovers — Flock Back

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The Tithe Barn at Avebury, owned by the U.K.'s National Trust, is home to a museum dedicated to the Avebury Henge. It's also now, unhappily, home to a very damaged thatched roof. The National Trust hide caption

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The National Trust

For 15 years, biologists in single-person, ultralight aircraft would each lead an experimental flock of young whooping cranes from Wisconsin to a winter home in Florida. But not anymore. Dave Umberger/AP hide caption

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Dave Umberger/AP

To Make A Wild Comeback, Cranes Need More Than Flying Lessons

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Starlings migrating in huge numbers come to roost this time of year in Rome. In the past, the city used special speakers that emit sounds of predators and starling distress calls to make the birds fly elsewhere. This year, falcons have been enlisted to drive the starlings out — without success. Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

Dodging Droppings, Romans Cope With Massive Influx Of Starlings

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The view at daybreak in Bosque del Apache, N.M. John Fowler/Flickr hide caption

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John Fowler/Flickr

What Does Daybreak Sound Like Where You Live?

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Squirrels closely mimic bird warning calls and help spread the alarm through the forest that hawks, owls or other predators are nearby. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Squirrels Mimic Bird Alarms To Foil The Enemy

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California condors have enormous wingspans. That's fine in the wilderness, but when a bird of this size encounters a power line, the results can be fatal. The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has a program to help train birds to avoid the hazard. Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr hide caption

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Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr

Small Shocks Help Enormous Birds Learn To Avoid Power Lines

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By law, all wild swans in Great Britain belong to Queen Elizabeth. Alpha/Landov hide caption

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Alpha/Landov

In Britain, Who's Tormenting The Queen's Swans?

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An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

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Rainer Schoch/Nature

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

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The skull of a chicken embryo (left) has a recognizable beak. But when scientists block the expression of two particular genes, the embryo develops a rounded "snout" (center) that looks something like an alligator's skull (right). Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar hide caption

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Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar

How Bird Beaks Got Their Start As Dinosaur Snouts

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Fernandina's Flicker (Colaptes fernandinae), a woodpecker found only in Cuba. Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis hide caption

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Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis

U.S. Biologists Keen To Explore, Help Protect Cuba's Wild Places

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The European eagle owl, like this one from the Mulhouse Zoo in eastern France, is one of the largest owl species, with a wingspan of about 6 feet. Sebastien Bozon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastien Bozon/AFP/Getty Images

Bar-headed geese tend to follow the sharp ups and downs of the Himalayas as they migrate, research finds. John Downer/Nature Picture Library/Corbis hide caption

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John Downer/Nature Picture Library/Corbis

Highflying Geese Save Energy By Swooping Like A Roller Coaster

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