Kids and parents often shy away from talking about their struggles at the doctor's office. But the American Academy of Pediatrics is now urging its members to screen kids for food insecurity during well-child visits. iStockphoto hide caption

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Are You Hungry? Pediatricians Add A New Question During Checkups

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The federal food stamps program is working to make sure low-income Americans are getting enough calories, but those calories are less nutritious than what everyone else eats, research finds. The USDA is funding programs to try to bridge that gap, such as initiatives that allow food stamp recipients to use their benefits at farmers markets. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Erica Johnson prays before her meal. She volunteers at the food pantry at John Still school where three of her four children are students. She eats alone after she feeds her kids. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Beyond Free Lunch: Schools Open Food Pantries For Hungry Families

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At the We Care food bank in Southeast London, customers pay 1 pound sterling, or about $1.60, for 10 items. The token payment is meant to ease customers' discomfort about having to use the food bank's services. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Record Number Of Britons Are Using Food Banks

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John Umland (left) and John Torrens gather donated cans of food in 2011 in Rohnert Park, Calif., for the group Neighbors Organized Against Hunger. Hunger advocates say a lot of nutritionally dense food like canned tuna and beans can be cheaper than processed food. Kent Porter/ZUMA Press/Corbis hide caption

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Volunteers pass out fresh vegetables for a Thanksgiving meal at the Alameda Food Bank in Alameda, Calif., in 2009. The percentage of Americans who report struggling to afford food has remained stubbornly near recession-era highs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Homeless advocate Arnold Abbott, 90, director of the nonprofit group Love Thy Neighbor Inc., prepares a salad Wednesday in the kitchen of The Sanctuary Church in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Abbott was recently arrested, along with two pastors, for feeding the homeless in a Fort Lauderdale park. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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The homeless and others in need enjoy lunch at the Los Angeles Mission on Nov. 23, 2011, in celebration of Thanksgiving. Legislation to ban organizations from serving food to homeless people in public places has been proposed in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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People shop in a Miami grocery store on July 8. USDA says that despite the drop in unemployment, the number of food insecure Americans has not declined because higher food prices and inflation last year offset the benefits of a brighter job market. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Volunteers at the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore sort and box food donations on a conveyor belt. The bank started working with groups like the USO in 2013 to provide food aid to families affiliated with nearby military bases. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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More Military Families Are Relying On Food Banks And Pantries

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Shabazz Napier of the Connecticut Huskies speaks to the media in the locker room after defeating Kentucky in the NCAA men's championship on April 7. Jamie Squire/Getty Images hide caption

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Food banks have become a primary source of nutrition for rural farmworker communities in the Central Valley. Scott Anger/KQED hide caption

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Amid Fields Of Plenty, A Farmworker's Wife Struggles To Feed Her Family

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A mural in the isolated city of Iqaluit, in Canada, where food insecurity is tied up with native culture, poverty, and high food prices. ascappatura/Flickr.com hide caption

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This Panera Cares store in Chicago switched from for-profit to nonprofit this summer, and it started asking customers to pay whatever they want. Niala Boodhoo for NPR hide caption

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Panera Sandwich Chain Explores 'Pay What You Want' Concept

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Recession Still Hurting U.S. Families Trying To Put Food On The Table

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