Sara Terry and her son, Christian, in Spring, Texas. After sequencing Christian's genome, doctors were able to diagnose him with a Noonan-like syndrome. Eric Kayne for NPR hide caption

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Doctors Sift Through Patients' Genomes To Solve Medical Mysteries
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The genetic factors responsible for a cat's stripes might help researchers understand disease resistance in humans. kennymatic via Flickr hide caption

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Could Genes For Stripes Help Kitty Fight Disease?
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Watson, now 84, says sequencing helped explain his past sensitivity to certain drugs. But he didn't want to know everything his sequenced genome revealed about his health future. Courtesy of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory hide caption

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Scientists See Upside And Downside Of Sequencing Their Own Genes
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