Taxis wait in London in June 2014. By law, the drivers of London's black cabs must memorize all of the city's streets, a process that takes years of study. The taxi drivers are opposed to Uber and drivers using a GPS, but the High Court ruled in favor of Uber last week. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oli Scarff/Getty Images

London's Cabbies Say 'The Knowledge' Is Better Than Uber And A GPS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/450235327/450611872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uber, Lyft And No More Loans: Twilight Is Here For Big-City Taxi Barons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/430221591/430221592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Traffic stands still in Nairobi. People in Kenya's capital don't like getting into cabs driven by strangers. They prefer to call drivers they know or who their friends recommend. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Goran Tomasevic/Reuters/Landov

A Taxi App Aims To Build Trust Where Crime Is High

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/411538709/411660295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Seattle's government has given early approval to caps on ride-share companies such as Uber. Here, Peter Faris, whose company's drivers use Uber to find customers, holds a smartphone with the ride-sharing company's app in Washington, D.C. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Why Does A Taxi Medallion Cost $1 Million?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142866785/142869024" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">