The Rock of Gibraltar, and Gibraltar's marina. The British territory at the southern end of Spain was known as a tax haven and hosts an office of Mossack & Fonseca, the law firm at the center of the Panama Papers. However, Gibraltar amended its laws five years ago and sees itself as a low-tax place that's attractive for international business. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Once A Tax Haven, Gibraltar Now Says It's Low-Tax

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474367890/474569160" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Rock of Gibraltar, as seen from the Spanish town of La Linea de la Concepcion, at Spain's southern tip. Gibraltar has been British territory for 301 years, but many Spaniards want it back. Fresh squabbles over fishing rights cropped up recently. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Frayer/NPR

The Squabble That Never Ends: Britain and Spain Duel Over Gibraltar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/306861136/311521461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A dispute over fishing rights at Gibraltar has grown into an international spat between Britain and Spain. Here, cars sit in line at the border crossing between Spain and Gibraltar earlier this month. Marcos Moreno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marcos Moreno/AFP/Getty Images